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Got Doubt?

   Allison is about to land the client of her dreams when the last question asked by the prospect brings up a huge wave of DOUBT. Doubt seeps into her answer, and she loses the job to another candidate.

A client decides he wants to upgrade his business and signs off on your agreement on Friday. On Monday morning, he backs out.

 He tells you he thought about it and “can’t afford it.”

He has what I call “buyer’s remorse.”

What really happened? He began to DOUBT. He isn’t really doubting your ability, but rather his own decision-making ability. Unfortunately, uncertainty about himself is what will prevent him from having the very results he says he wants to produce.

It is so easy to DOUBT – one’s choices, one’s knowledge, one’s worthiness, one’s persistence.

DOUBT destroys enthusiasm, creativity, innovation, joy.

DOUBT diminishes performance.

Ask any professional athlete and he or she will tell you that as soon as doubt creeps into the mind, the scoreboard swings in the direction of the opponent.

We stop ourselves from the very things we say we want by doubting our choices and our ability to do those things we truly yearn for in business and life.

Second-guessing ourselves and others is a national pastime that serves no one.

Have you ever noticed how your friends and family will so easily endorse your uncertainty, but not be quite so free to endorse your bigger dreams and desires?

I am not saying we should indiscriminately do everything we feel like doing. Yet there is a huge distinction between being thoughtful and DOUBTING oneself.

Now consider this: where would we be today if Bill Gates had let doubt trump his decision to drop out of Harvard, or if Steve Jobs had allowed doubt to stop his decision to leave Apple or if J.K. Rowling had doubted her passion for writing ?

Common wisdom says your first reaction is the right one. This is because you intuitively KNOW what is right for you. If you listen carefully to your inner wisdom, you will hear what it is that is right for you. It is when you refuse to listen to this inner voice that this lack of trust in yourself eclipses your confidence.

I say it’s time to dump DOUBT from our minds and prevent it from destroying the joy and passion for the things and experiences that make life rich, juicy, and joyous.

It’s time to transform your doubt into determination.

 

Where have you doubted a choice, doubted yourself, doubted others and robbed yourself of experiencing something you’ve really wanted? Were DOUBT right or wrong?

 

It’s Not Just Food: Jon Favreau’s Movie “Chef” – An 8 Step Lesson In Social Media Success

To me, the best movies are ones that entertain as well as teach.

That’s how I felt about Jon Favreau’s new movie Chef.

Jon Favreau is a successful character actor and is probably most well-known as director of super hits Ironman 1 & 2, and Cowboys & Aliens.

Now, in his new movie Chef, he directs and stars as a down and out chef who is at a crossroads in his career. Frustration with his career causes him to lash out at a food critic, and thus begins this hilarious and heartwarming story (I suggest you don’t go see it hungry).

This is not a movie review

What I really wanted to tell you about is that this movie is also a brilliant crash course in what to do right (even if by accident) to get known, loved, and become a business winner through social media.

(Don’t worry, I won’t give away the ending).

The first lesson is:

1. Become buddy buddy with your kids who are 10 years old or younger. They get it.

In the movie, Carl Casper, (a.k.a Chef Carl Casper) hasn’t a clue about social media. In a fit of exasperation, he tells his 10-year-old son to “sign him up” on Twitter. His son makes up in social media savvy what he lacks in years.

2. Controversy sells. Clueless Carl is so ticked off by his bad restaurant review he sends off what he thinks is a private Twitter email to the food critic, “You wouldn’t know a good meal if it sat on your face.” Let the games begin……

3. Get someone with a mega-following to fight back with you. If you are in online repartee with a celeb or someone who has a mega-following (in this case the food critic had over 100K followers on Twitter), it rapidly generated over 1000 response tweets and retweets.

4. Be outrageous on camera and share it. There is an old advertising adage: “Any publicity, even bad publicity, is good for business.” Whether you agree or not, Jerry Springer and Dr. Phil have proven that people behaving badly ups the ratings. So it was in “Chef” when Carl goes ape on camera and it is shared across the web.

5. Tweet & post about topics people really hunger for. (Ugggh, excuse the pun) There are some topics people just love and are rabid about. Food is one of them – just look at how many successful cooking shows there are! So if you start posting about restaurants and foods, there’s a good chance people will pay attention. Plus hunger never goes out of style.

6. Pick a Twitter handle that has cache and intrigue. In the movie, Carl’s son tries to sign him up as @CarlCasper. Obviously that’s taken, but as fortune would have it @ChefCarlCasper is not. @ChefCarlCasper is so much more interesting, relevant, and you can’t get better alliteration for an extra dose of memorability.

I just checked – someone from Jon’s team registered @ChefCarlCasper – smart thinking.

7. Add Photos & Hashtags to build anticipation and a following. Carl’s boy Percy has all the angles covered when he starts taking photos and adds #locationhashtags to each stop of their culinary road trip. People at each stop are already fans.

8.Combine social media platforms that play off one another. Percy gets juiced when he sees Twitter pumping up their attention. He layers in Instagram, and then Facebook, and then starts piecing together 1-second videos on Vine for an irresistable “foodumentary.” The results are booming new business.

Would It Have Worked In Real Life?


None of these lessons is social media rocket science. What is important to realize is that “Chef” put all the ingredients for how to go viral on social media together in one cinematic bowl, stirred rigorously and with great humor, gave us a top rate recipe for social media success.

Take a few bites and see what works for you.

Yum.

Why They Won’t Open Your E-Newsletter (And Why They’re Right)

How many newsletters do you get a day? 5, 10, more? How many of them do you open and read? If you’re like most business people, you are opening only 5-10% of the electronic newsletters you receive, if that. The rest wind up in the cyber dumpster. You or your firm have probably sent email […]

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Can You Really Motivate Young Professionals To Become Rainmakers?

Alex, a director in a rapidly growing regional accounting firm was in the Managing Partner’s office.  He had been participating in a 6 month business development/rainmaking coaching and training program with disappointing results. The Managing Partner decided to find out what the problem was. MP: Is the problem the coach? Is the problem the cost? […]

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How To Turn Boring Small Talk Into Big Results

Few would argue that networking is an essential practice for business success. Why, then, are so many people turned off by the process? I’ve interviewed hundreds of professionals, business people, and executives about this very issue. Can you guess what the top 3 networking turnoffs were? The top 3 turnoffs were:  Starting up a conversation […]

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10-Min Way To Stay In Touch & Pump Up Sales

It’s that time of year when we naturally stay in touch – with family, friends, clients and colleagues. It feels so wonderful to be in connection with the people in our lives. So, why don’t we do this year round in our business when it would maximize our results? Case in point: My client, Eric […]

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